söndag 4 februari 2018

My 2017 Academic production (follow-up)

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My previous blog post summarized my 2017 production of academic papers. This blog post expands that list and drills a bit further down by following up each of the 30 writing projects I listed in the previous blog post. This includes texts written in 2016 that were "unresolved" by the end of that year as well as all texts written in 2017 (also those that were not resolved at the end of the year). Papers that I wrote/worked on in 2016 will also be found in last year's blog post but will since have changed their status to published,  rejected or withdrawn.

While I in fact do know some more about the status of some of the paper in the list below, this blog "should" have been published in the beginning of January and it is written based on the information I had at that time.

I have organized the papers in chronological order in terms of when they were (or will be) presented/published or alternatively when they were rejected/withdrawn. I also link back to the original blog posts of each paper. I have furthermore added helpful color-coding to the titles of the papers as follows:

- Published/presented (100% finished, no work remains to be done)
- Accepted for publication/presentation, 100% finished but has not yet been published (journal articles) or presented (conference papers)
Finished, submitted, reviewed and rejected
- Finished, submitted, reviewed, accepted (or conditionally accepted) but withdrawn
- Finished, submitted and currently under review or conditionally accepted and being re-written at the moment (could later be rejected, could be accepted as-is or might need further work)
Submitted and conditionally accepted for publication but currently only exists in the form of an (extended) abstract. The major part of the work remains to be done
Submitted but currently only exists as an (extended) abstract. Acceptance (or rejection) is pending. The major part of the work remains to be done (if accepted)



- The journal article "The sharing economy as the commons of the 21st century" (Karin Bradley, Daniel Pargman) was finally published in the Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society's (CJRES) special issue on "Sharing Economies? Theories, practices and impacts". The final version of the journal article (open access - available to everyone online!) was submitted in July 2016 and the article was published in February 2017 and I wrote a blog post about it. We started to work on the article during the first half of 2015! "This paper aims to make a contribution to the debate on how contemporary collaborative commons, as part of the wider sharing economy, can be understood and supported."

- The conference paper "Useless games for a sustainable world" (Daniel Pargman, Björn Hedin) was presented at a workshop on "Uselessness" that was organized by the University of Amsterdam/Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis at at the end of March 2017. Me and Björn had amazing discussions that lead to counterintuitive conclusions and we think this well-written workshop paper is a springboard for at least one future full papers. I wrote a blog post about our submission on the blog in October 2016. "Are computer games “useful” or are they “useless” when regarded through a sustainability lens and against a backdrop of problematising the relationship between sustainability and consumption?".

- The proposed conference paper "'I have no use for useless PhDs': Interrogating the notion of uselessness in techno-scientific culture" (Leif Dahlberg, Daniel Pargman) was accepted for presentation at the same workshop on "Uselessness" (see above). The paper offered me and Leif the opportunity to work and to write something together for the very first time and while we did most of the work to collect an empirical, the material did not directly support our hypothesis and the required time to work on and rewrite the paper just wasn't there so we had to withdraw it. I wrote about our submission on the blog in October. "What is the understanding of uselessness in contemporary techno-scientific culture? We investigate this question through interviews with three high-powered, prominent professors at Sweden’s oldest, largest and (arguably) most prestigious technical university, KTH Royal Institute of Technology".

- The proposed conference paper "ICT support for collective energy management in housing cooperatives" (Hanna Hasselqvist, Daniel Pargman, Cristian Bogdan, Isaac Rondon) was submitted to the conference Energy for Society: 1st International Conference on Energy Research & Social Science but it was rejected. The conference was held outside of Barcelona in the beginning of April 2017. The proposed paper was built on the master's thesis that Isaac Rondon wrote this past spring with me as supervisor and Hanna as principal.  I wrote about our submission on the blog in November 2016. "We have studied energy management in housing cooperatives, a common form of housing in the Nordic countries, where the household energy consumption (heating, hot water and electricity use) depends on collective decisions that affect all the housing cooperative members".

- The proposed conference paper "Coalworld: Envisioning a world with half the oil" (Daniel Pargman, Mikael Höök) was submitted to the conference Energy for Society: 1st International Conference on Energy Research & Social Science but it was rejected. The proposed paper represented an early attempt to summarize and disseminate information about the multi-article Coalworld project. I wrote about our submission on the blog in November 2016. "We argue that when considering the environmental impact of innovative, energy-saving ICTs, the allure is to replace old devices at an accelerated pace. However, the energy savings alone do not come anyway near offsetting the energy cost of manufacturing these new devices."

- The proposed conference paper "Homo colossus' energy slaves" (Daniel Pargman) was submitted to the conference Energy for Society: 1st International Conference on Energy Research & Social Science but it was rejected. The proposed paper calculates, conceptualizes and visualizes the vast amounts of energy we consume in our daily lives. I wrote a blog post about my submission on the blog in November 2016. "We specifically propose the use of two strong concepts to help us visualize our extravagant use of energy, namely the concept of “energy slaves” (Nikiforuk 2014) and the idea that each of us is a “homo colossus” (Catton 1986, 1987). [...] This paper illustrates how even the poorest of us nowadays have an oversized ecological footprint, but how the richest 1% or 10% on Earth are creatures of mind-boggling proportions".

- The proposed conference paper "Municipal climate and energy advisors: A way forward or a 'Mission: Impossible'?" (Björn Hedin, Daniel Pargman, Henrik Artman) was submitted and accepted for presentation to Energy for Society: 1st International Conference on Energy Research & Social Science it but was later withdrawn. This paper proposal builds work in the research project "Improved energy counseling and energy habits by Quantified Self Assisted Advisory". I wrote about our submission on the blog in November 2016. "Sweden has chosen to finance “municipal energy and climate advisors” for providing impartial locally adapted energy and climate advice to individuals. [...] Our conclusion is that [they] harbour the potential to serve an important purpose, but that the regulations surrounding them make [their work into a] “mission: impossible”."

- The proposed conference paper "When good intentions are not enough: How energy-stingy screen technologies can lead to higher consumption" (Daniel Pargman, Oliver Bates) was submitted and accepted for presentation to Energy for Society: 1st International Conference on Energy Research & Social Science it but was later withdrawn. This paper represents an attempt of extending the 2016 ICT4S conference paper "Designing for sustainability: Breakthrough or suboptimisation?". I wrote about our submission on the blog in November 2016. "We argue that when considering the environmental impact of innovative, energy-saving ICTs, the allure is to replace old devices at an accelerated pace. However, the energy savings alone do not come anyway near offsetting the energy cost of manufacturing these new devices."

- The proposed conference paper "Using low-fi user-centered design methods to overcome barriers to adopting photovoltaics in Sweden" (Robin Chanapai, Daniel Pargman) was submitted and accepted for presentation to Energy for Society: 1st International Conference on Energy Research & Social Science it but was later withdrawn. This paper proposal builds on the master's thesis that Robin Chanapai wrote during the spring of 2016 with me as supervisor. I wrote about our submission on the blog in November 2016. "In this paper we [...] discuss how the use of low-fidelity user-centered design methods and the resulting user interfaces can be utilized to find out more about, and build upon the positive motivations of homeowners’ interest in investing in PV [solar cells/Photovoltaics]".

- The conference paper "Means and ends in human-computer interaction: Sustainability through disintermediation" (Barath Raghavan, Daniel Pargman) was accepted and presented at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in May 2017. CHI is the premier international conference of Human-Computer Interaction and presenting there is a Big Thing. This is also the long-promised companion paper to our 2014 paper "Rethinking sustainability in computing: From buzzword to non-negotiable limitations". I wrote about the paper on the blog in December 2016. "In this paper we observe that taking these broader contexts into account yields a fundamentally different way to think about sustainable interaction design, one in which the designer’s focus must be on a) ecological limits, b) creating designs and artifacts that do not further a cornucopian paradigm, and c) fundamental human needs."

- The conference paper "The (Un)sustainability of Imagined Future Information Societies" (Daniel Pargman, Elina Eriksson, Mattias Höjer, Ulrika Gunnarsson Östling, Luciane Aguiar Borges) was accepted and presented at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in May 2017. I wrote about the paper on the blog in December 2016. Do also note that this is in fact a reworked and improved version of a previously 2016 rejected paper (quick turnaround!). "This paper describes the results of a research project in the intersection of HCI and Futures Studies as well as in the intersection between “the future information society” and sustainability. We discuss examples of what future information societies could look like and what the impact of these societies would be in terms of sustainability"

- The CHI conference workshop submission "Waste reduction in the sustainable grocery store" (Daniel Pargman, Sofie Nyström, Cecilia Katzeff) was presented at the CHI workshop on "Designing sustainable food systems" (FoodCHI) in May 2017. I wrote a blog post about the submission in January: "In this position paper we focus on the grocery store and more specifically on the challenge of reducing waste in/from the store. The paper is based on ongoing work in the part of the larger project that works with the concept “The sustainable store”."

The journal article "21st century sports: Movements without movements" (Daniel Pargman, Daniel Svensson) was submitted to the International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations' (IJGCMS) special issue on "eSports and professional game play". I wrote a blog post about our submission in February. The text was rejected due to "technical reasons" and the text was never reviewed. Our text is a hurried and only slightly adapted version of an unpublished paper we presented at a conference some years earlier: "Computer games have ... gone from being a leisure activity for kids and teenagers to becoming a competitive activity, “esports”, with international competitions and professional players. We argue that there is a tight connections between the sportification of traditional (physical) sports and modernity just as it is possible to see the emergence of “21st century sports” such as esports as portending a post-modern society".

- The proposed conference paper "Strangers are welcome: Hosting pop-up offices in the Hoffice network" (Daniel Pargman, Emma Lundin) was submitted and accepted for presentation at the 4th International Workshop on the Sharing Economy. I wrote a blog post about our submission in March 2017. The paper was unfortunately withdrawn since the workshop was organized too close to other events (see below) and there just wasn't enough time to finish the paper and to go to the workshop. "Hoffice helps people arrange impromptu “home offices” where hosts share their kitchen table and other workspaces resources (internet connection, microwave oven and not the least their company!) with people who can “book” a seat for the day. The purpose ... is to create free workspaces as well as social, structured and disciplined work environments that allows individuals to benefit from others’ support and intelligence."

- The workshop submission "Smart magic city run: Exploring the implications of public augmented reality games" (Daniel Pargman, Tina Ringenson, Miriam Rivera Börjesson, Lisa Schmitz, Maria Krinaki, Nino Prekratic and Björn Lundkvist) was accepted to the workshop "Playable Cities: The City as a Digital Playground" at the 9th International Conference on Intelligent Technologies for Interactive Entertainment" (INTETAIN 2017). I wrote a blog post about the paper in June 2017. The camera-ready version was submitted in December 2017 and will be published in the  (Springer) conference proceedings. "We ... describe a student project that resulted in a concept for a pervasive augmented reality game, Magic Run. The game concept has ... been “leveled up” by running it through smart city researchers who have scrutinized and noticed various troubling elements of the proposed game. We have then together redesigned the game ... to better fit the reality of the smart future city."

- The conference paper "Developing a framework for evaluating the sustainability of computing projects" (Anton Lundström, Daniel Pargman) was presented at the Third Workshop on Computing within Limits (LIMITS). The paper builds on Anton's master's thesis that he worked on and later defended in 2016 and I presented out paper at the Computing within Limits workshop in June 2017. I wrote a blog post about the paper in March 2017. "Toyama (2015) proposed a taxonomy for sustainable computing in the hope that it would be able to help shed light on which computing efforts contribute to sustainability and which don’t. ... This paper represents an attempt to move the taxonomy from preliminary to operational."

- The conference paper "Resource scarcity and socially just Internet access over time and space" (Daniel Pargman, Björn Wallsten) was presented at the Third Workshop on Computing within Limits (LIMITS). The paper builds on on- and off discussions I have had with Björn over a longer period of time and we discussed writing the paper at least one year earlier and perhaps earlier than that. I wrote a blog post about the paper in March 2017. "This paper discusses limits to computing by adopting a resource perspective on the provisioning of infrastructure for computing ... We suggest that in a resource-constrained world and in the area of computing, a suitable goal for innovation should be to guarantee (to the largest extent possible) internet access over space and time, e.g., to the largest number of people and for the longest duration of time."

- The 500-word abstract "Estranging energy: Teaching abstract concepts through making strange" (Jerry Määttä, Daniel Pargman) was accepted for presentation in the academic track (theme: "100 Years of Estrangement") of the 75th World Science Fiction Convention in Helsinki in August 2018. This was my first paper/project together with Science Fiction studies literary scholar Jerry Määttä. We didn't quite write a paper, but we did put together an ambitious "manuscript" for Jerry's presentation that can be extended into a paper and perhaps submitted to a academic journal for science fiction studies! I wrote about our submission on the blog in November 2016. "Few people intuitively grasp [the energy use and carbon emissions] of our modern, high-energy technological lifestyle. The aim of this paper is to examine and discuss [...] the use of images, metaphors, and estrangement, enabling especially students to defamiliarise abstract concepts such as energy"

- The journal article "What if there had only been half the oil? Rewriting history to envision the consequences of peak oil" (previous title: "On the effects of the early 1970's global peak in oil production") (Daniel Pargman, Elina Eriksson, Mikael Höök, Joshua Tanenbaum, Marcel Pufal, Josefin Wangel) was published in the Energy Research & Social Science (ER&SS) special issue on "Narratives and storytelling in energy and climate change research" in September 2017 and I wrote a blog post about ut. "We argue that there is a need for narratives in general and for a special type of narrative in particular, allohistorical scenarios, that act as thought experiments whose main function is to defamiliarize us with what is taken for granted. ... We here present the design rationale for the Coalworld scenario: an alternative world where only half the oil ever existed."

- The journal article "After oil leaves us: Designing allohistorical production curves for studying global transformation narratives" (Mikael Höök, Daniel Pargman) was submitted to a special issue on "Energy and the Future" in the journal Energy Research & Social Science but it was rejected. I wrote a blog post about it in January 2017. This is the second article in our planned series of Coalworld articles and we plan to rewrite and resubmit the paper elsewhere. "In this paper, we employ an allohistorical scenario (counterfactual history) to model "Coalworld", an alternative world where only half the oil ever existed. ... We elaborate on a narrative explanation for "removing" half of the world's oil while otherwise compromising as little as possible compared to our world and exemplify by looking at the production curves of a few exemple nations."

- The journal article "Fair trade in the energy slave market" (Daniel Pargman, Ambjörn Næve) was submitted to a special issue on "Energy and the Future" in the journal Energy Research & Social Science but it was rejected. I wrote a blog post about it in January 2017. This was the first paper I have ever write together with Ambjörn Næve but there are unfortunately no current plans to rewrite it. "In everyday life and within the social sciences, the very term "energy" is used in a way that is not compliant with the natural science usage of the term. This [hinders] us from developing a cross-disciplinary understanding of energy-related issues as well as from taking appropriate policy measures. We argue that emphasis should be placed on the interplay between energy and work, i.e., between energy and exergy."

- The journal article "The green democratic energy narrative" (Ulrika Gunnarsson Östling, Daniel Pargman,  Karin Bradley) was submitted to a special issue on "Energy and the Future" in the journal Energy Research & Social Science. It was conditionally accepted but we later withdrew the article. The reviews we received were encouraging but required an extensive work effort that just wasn't feasible within the time constraints of the special issue. I wrote a blog post about it in January 2017. This paper has since been shelved but we are now in fact discussing a possible revival and resubmission elsewhere. "Renewable energy sources is and have been a continuing source of hope for ... ushering in a utopian, green, decentralised, affordable, democratic, equitable, renewable and resilient energy regime ... but is it realistic ... or, are there tension between having both renewable energy and an equitable democratic society?"

- The text "A grand challenge for HCI: Food + Sustainability" (Juliet Norton, Ankita Raturi, Bonnie Nardi, Sebastian Prost, Samantha McDonald, Daniel Pargman, Oliver Bates, Maria Normark, Bill Tomlinson, Nico Herbig, Lynn Dombrowski) was published in ACM's professional journal Interactions. I wrote a blog post about it in November 2017. This text builds on the outcomes of the workshop "Designing sustainable food systems" that I participated in at the CHI conference in May 2017. "This year at the ACM CHI Conference, we gathered as a group of HCI researchers, designers, and practitioners to reflect on our role in designing sustainable food systems. ... The workshop culminated in a design session focused on techniques and paradigms for future components of a sustainable food system."

- The book chapter "On the inherent contradictions of teaching sustainability at a technical university" (Elina Eriksson, Daniel Pargman) is one of thirteen chapters in the book "Digital Technology and Sustainability: Engaging the Paradox" (edited by Mike Hazas and Lisa Nathan). The final version was submitted in April 2017 and I wrote a blog post about our chapter in July 2016. "In this book chapter, we present five anecdotes from our experience of teaching an introductory course in sustainability to Media technology engineering students, that exemplify occasions when teaching sustainability at a technological university make us run up to various barriers. The anecdotes will unveil tensions and contradictions of different kind, but we argue that these might be an unavoidable precondition for change."

- We submitted a paper about "[design]" (Daniel Pargman, Staffan Björk, Maria Håkansson) to the prestigious 2018 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems but it was rejected. I wrote a blog post about it in September 2017. The reviews actually weren't too bad, but we didn't even bother to write a rebuttal (a plea/promise to rewrite the paper in certain ways to meet the reviewers critique) as there was no single reviewer who seemed likely to take a stand and fight on behalf of our paper (the reviewers were unanimously lukewarm towards the paper).

- The paper "Undesigning the Internet: An exploratory study of reducing everyday Internet connectivity" (Kelly Widdicks, Tina Ringenson, Daniel Pargman, Vishnupriya Kuppusamy, Patricia Lago) was submitted to the Fifth International Conference on ICT for Sustainability (ICT4S). I wrote a blog post about it in November 2017. This paper is a spin-off of the ICT4S summer school that all five authors attended in July/August 2017. "excessive Internet use is not sustainable or even always socially beneficial. In this paper, we carried out an exploratory study on how Internet disconnection affects our everyday lives and whether such disconnection is even possible in today’s society. Through daily surveys, we captured what Internet use means for ten participants and how this varies when they are asked to disconnect by default, and reconnect only when their Internet use is deemed as necessary."

- The paper "Barriers for sustainable waste management practices in grocery stores: Exploration by Research-through-Design" (Sofie Nyström, Cecilia Katzeff, Daniel Pargman) was submitted to the Fifth International Conference on ICT for Sustainability (ICT4S). I wrote a blog post about it in November 2017. "In this paper, we explore waste practices within grocery stores and how feedback through visualizations may help stores improve their waste management. We have studied the gap between current waste data and waste data that is both meaningful and can be acted upon as well as barriers between actionable data and organizational change. ... two mockups of web visualizations were designed and later evaluated"

- The paper "Quantified self for sustainability: Limitations and possibilities" (Björn Hedin, Daniel Pargman, Miriam Börjesson Rivera) was submitted to the Fifth International Conference on ICT for Sustainability (ICT4S). I wrote a blog post about it in December 2017. "Some aspects of our lives ... such as greenhouse gas emissions (CO2e) generated by different decisions in our everyday lives are [hard] to track. Such aspects must instead be derived from other data sources, such as when calculating CO2e emitted when driving a car, or from eating a meal. The transformations that are required ... introduce uncertainties, making the results deceptively precise. In this paper, we present a framework that can be used to understand and express these uncertainties."

- The article "21st century sports: Movements without movements" (Daniel Svensson, Daniel Pargman) was submitted to a special issue on "The emergence of e-sports: Challenges and Opportunities" in the journal "Sport, Ethics, and Philosophy". I wrote a blog post about it in October 2017. "Modern sports have gone through a process of sportification (e.g. Guttman 1978, Yttergren 1996), moving from loosely regulated games and play towards becoming progressively more managed and regulated. Computer games have correspondingly gone from being a leisure activity for kids and teenagers to becoming a competitive activity, electronic sport or “e-sports”, with international competitions and professional players. We argue that ... the emergence of “21st century sports” such as various e-sports as portending a post-modern society."

- The article "Computing within Limits" (Bonnie Nardi, Bill Tomlinson, Donald Patterson, Jay Chen, Daniel Pargman, Barath Raghavan, Birgit Penzenstadler) was submitted to ACM's prestigious professional journal Communications of the ACM (CACM) in August 2017 but I did not write a blog post about it. "Computing researchers are often implicitly [focus) on a particular type of future [that] assumes that current trajectories of increased growth and consumption will continue. ... In this paper we explore the relationship between these potential futures and computing research. What possible or even probable futures are we ignoring? What hidden assumptions about the future are embedded in most computing research? What work should we be doing to respond to fundamental planetary limits, and the ecological and energetic constraints that global society faces over the coming years and decades?"
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